How can I make a section sticky like a header?

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torystcyr
torystcyr Member Posts: 7
edited April 4 in Ask a Question

I'm have very little programming knowledge. With that being said, I am building a site in which I want the header to be sticky (just like the ones that are available with templates) but I want my other pages to have the sidebar menu look and functionality. So essentially I need two layouts in one site.

To get around this I made the site a sidebar layout, and have the sidebar hidden on my home page. I have created a row and have added a logo and navigational widget so that it looks just like a header.

The only problem that I have at the moment is that it's not sticky and thus it scrolls up with the rest of the content as I move down the site. I would like it to remain at the top as I scroll down the site.

I have opened the html/css editor for the row but for the life of me I don't see how to make that whole row sticky or if it's even possible.

(Attached is the code for the "header" I created.)

Any help is greatly appreciated!

Best Answer

  • visioncraft
    visioncraft Member Posts: 161 Learner
    edited September 2023 Answer ✓
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    Hi there, @torystcyr ! So, if I understood correctly, here is what you're trying to do: you have a site where you want the navigation menu to be a sidebar, on all pages. Then, only on the Home page you want a 'traditional' fixed horizontal navigation menu at the top, too. Is that right?

    If so, I think you're almost there. Probably the easiest way to achieve what you're trying to do is exactly what you're doing: set the site layout to 'sidebar menu', then just add the extra fixed menu you want on the Home page. So, the question becomes: how to add an 'fixed menu' to the Home page?

    You have designed an entire row as a menu, and that may be what's giving you trouble. It's not possible to make an entire row (or flex section) 'sticky'. You can, however, place a widget inside the row (or flex section) and make that widget 'sticky'. Try this:

    1. Add a 'Navigation Links' widget to the very top of your Home page.
    2. Format the widget so it looks like the 'menu' you want - add padding, change background colour, etc.
    3. In the widget's menu, select 'Edit HTML/CSS' to enter the Code Editor
    4. Select the 'CSS' tab, and make sure you are in the 'General CSS for All Devices' tab. You will see some CSS code already there. You'll need to add 3 lines between the first set of curly brackets:
    …{
        position: fixed;
        top: 25px;
        left: 25%;
    }
    

    When you finish, the Code Editor should look something like this:

    5. Click the Update button.

    Your navigation widget will now 'float' above the page and stay 'fixed' - i.e., sticky. You can control its position by using different values in the 'top' and 'left' attributes.

    Once the Navigation Widget is 'floating', it will 'stretch' to its maximum height, so you may have to add a height: attribute to your code to control that - something like height: 80px;.

    You can follow the same steps to make other elements on the page 'sticky' - eg., if you want to place a logo on one end of the navigation menu, add an Image widget with the logo, then follow the steps above to make the image sticky, and position it where you want.

    I hope this helps!

Answers

  • torystcyr
    torystcyr Member Posts: 7
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    Thank you so much! That's what I was trying to do.

    One other thing I did notice is that when I scroll down, header seems to be behind any images on the screen. I'm not sure if that's something with my images or if the menu can be adjusted for that. Thanks again!

  • visioncraft
    visioncraft Member Posts: 161 Learner
    edited September 2023
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    So glad to hear it worked for you!

    You can try using the z-index:css property to set the 'layer' where the element sits on the page, relative to all others. Elements that are added to the page later have a higher z-index, so to make your navigation menu appear 'on top' of all other elements on the page that come after it, you might have to add something like this to your CSS: z-index: 999;.

    Note that some UI elements like popups, sidebar menus or lightboxes, are supposed to appear on top of all other elements on your page - including your navigation menu. If you give your menu a z-index that is too high, it might make your navigation menu appear on top of those elements, too. So if you're using these elements - popups, lightboxes etc. - you might have to play with the z-index number of your menu until you find one that makes it sit 'on top' of the main page elements, but still below these other ones. Good luck!

  • JulieP
    JulieP Member Posts: 7
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    To make the header row sticky, you'll need to modify the CSS code for the specific div element that represents your header. From your code, it seems like the div with class .u_1996924642 is the main container for your header.

    Here's how you can make it sticky:

    CSS Modification:
    You'll want to add position: sticky;, top: 0;, and possibly a z-index to ensure it's above other elements:

    css
    Copy code
    *#dm .dmBody div.u_1996924642 {
    position: sticky;
    top: 0;
    z-index: 100; /
    This ensures the header stays on top of other page elements. Adjust as needed. */
    background-image: linear-gradient(90deg, rgba(0,0,0,1) 73%, rgba(12,6,46,1) 100%) !important;
    background-origin: border-box !important;
    background-repeat: no-repeat !important;
    box-shadow: rgba(0,0,0,0.25) 0px 3px 11px 0px !important;
    -moz-box-shadow: rgba(0,0,0,0.25) 0px 3px 11px 0px !important;
    -webkit-box-shadow: rgba(0,0,0,0.25) 0px 3px 11px 0px !important;
    }
    Check Parent Elements:
    One common pitfall with the sticky position is that any ancestor (parent) element with an overflow value set to anything other than visible can prevent the sticky behavior. Ensure there's no such style being applied. If there is, you might need to adjust or override that style.

    Browser Compatibility:
    Remember, while position: sticky; is supported in most modern browsers, you might want to check the compatibility if your audience uses older or uncommon browsers.

    Once you've made these changes, save your CSS, and then reload your website to see if the header is now sticky. If it's still not behaving as expected, it might be due to other CSS rules or JS scripts interfering, and you'd have to dive deeper into troubleshooting.

  • JulieP
    JulieP Member Posts: 7
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    Based on your description, you want the header-like row to be sticky at the top when you scroll down. This can be achieved using CSS by setting the position property to sticky and defining a top value. Here's how you can do it:

    1. CSS Solution:

    Open your CSS editor and locate the class or ID of the row that you want to make sticky. If you don't already have a specific class or ID for it, you might need to add one. For demonstration purposes, let's assume the class name is .my-header-row.

    Add the following CSS rules to this class:

    cssCopy code.my-header-row {
        position: -webkit-sticky; /* For Safari browser */
        position: sticky;
        top: 0; /* This will make it stick to the top */
        z-index: 1000; /* To ensure it stays on top of other content */
    }
    
    
    1. Z-index:
      The z-index value ensures that your sticky header stays above other elements on the page. Adjust the value as necessary based on your site's design.
    2. Browser Compatibility:
      The sticky position is widely supported in modern browsers, but always good to check against older versions or less common browsers if you have a diverse audience.
    3. Potential Issues:
      Ensure there's no overflow: hidden; applied to any parent elements of your header, as this can prevent the sticky effect from working.

  • JulieP
    JulieP Member Posts: 7
    Options

    To make the header row sticky, you'll need to modify the CSS code for the specific div element that represents your header. From your code, it seems like the div with class .u_1996924642 is the main container for your header.

    Here's how you can make it sticky:

    1. CSS Modification:

    You'll want to add position: sticky;, top: 0;, and possibly a z-index to ensure it's above other elements:

    cssCopy code*#dm *.dmBody div.u_1996924642 {
        position: sticky;
        top: 0;
        z-index: 100; /* This ensures the header stays on top of other page elements. Adjust as needed. */
        background-image: linear-gradient(90deg, rgba(0,0,0,1) 73%, rgba(12,6,46,1) 100%) !important;
        background-origin: border-box !important;
        background-repeat: no-repeat !important;
        box-shadow: rgba(0,0,0,0.25) 0px 3px 11px 0px !important;
        -moz-box-shadow: rgba(0,0,0,0.25) 0px 3px 11px 0px !important;
        -webkit-box-shadow: rgba(0,0,0,0.25) 0px 3px 11px 0px !important;
    }
    
    
    1. Check Parent Elements:

    One common pitfall with the sticky position is that any ancestor (parent) element with an overflow value set to anything other than visible can prevent the sticky behavior. Ensure there's no such style being applied. If there is, you might need to adjust or override that style.

    1. Browser Compatibility:

    Remember, while position: sticky; is supported in most modern browsers, you might want to check the compatibility if your audience uses older or uncommon browsers.

    Once you've made these changes, save your CSS, and then reload your website to see if the header is now sticky. If it's still not behaving as expected, it might be due to other CSS rules or JS scripts interfering, and you'd have to dive deeper into troubleshooting.

  • JulieP
    JulieP Member Posts: 7
    Options

    To make the header row sticky, you'll need to modify the CSS code for the specific div element that represents your header. From your code, it seems like the div with class .u_1996924642 is the main container for your header.

    Here's how you can make it sticky:

    1. CSS Modification:

    You'll want to add position: sticky;, top: 0;, and possibly a z-index to ensure it's above other elements:

    cssCopy code*#dm *.dmBody div.u_1996924642 {
        position: sticky;
        top: 0;
        z-index: 100; /* This ensures the header stays on top of other page elements. Adjust as needed. */
        background-image: linear-gradient(90deg, rgba(0,0,0,1) 73%, rgba(12,6,46,1) 100%) !important;
        background-origin: border-box !important;
        background-repeat: no-repeat !important;
        box-shadow: rgba(0,0,0,0.25) 0px 3px 11px 0px !important;
        -moz-box-shadow: rgba(0,0,0,0.25) 0px 3px 11px 0px !important;
        -webkit-box-shadow: rgba(0,0,0,0.25) 0px 3px 11px 0px !important;
    }
    
    
    1. Check Parent Elements:

    One common pitfall with the sticky position is that any ancestor (parent) element with an overflow value set to anything other than visible can prevent the sticky behavior. Ensure there's no such style being applied. If there is, you might need to adjust or override that style.

    1. Browser Compatibility:

    Remember, while position: sticky; is supported in most modern browsers, you might want to check the compatibility if your audience uses older or uncommon browsers.

    Once you've made these changes, save your CSS, and then reload your website to see if the header is now sticky. If it's still not behaving as expected, it might be due to other CSS rules or JS scripts interfering, and you'd have to dive deeper into troubleshooting.